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Local Governments and School Districts Blog

Allergy Relief

Authored by Kevin J.T. Terry
Posted on May 9, 2014
Filed under Local Governments and School Districts

Through the signing of Senate Bill 375, school districts now have more flexibility in assisting students with life-threatening allergies. Prior to the signing of this bill in April, only certain authorized school personnel were allowed to administer an epinephrine auto-injector, also known as EpiPen (a device designated to prevent or treat a life-threatening allergic reaction). Now, this provision is repealed and a school district has the option to draft and adopt a plan for the management of students who suffer from life-threatening allergies. The plan may allow school nurses to provide treatment and manage the individual student's care program. Additionally, the bill grants immunity from civil liability for a school and school personnel for injuries resulting from the administration or self-administration of an EpiPen.

School boards and school district administrators may want to take some time this summer to review the number of students in the district who suffer from these life-threatening allergies. Time should be taken to draft policies, train staff, and educate teachers about how the school district is going to assist these students.